Bud Ale “A new style of ale”?

by Franchise on May 9, 2008

Mmmm yummy BudBud Ale: “A New Style of Ale.” “Distinctly American.”Budweiser American Ale, due for release in October, will be billed as “a new style of ale.”That’s the language used on the label, based on filings with the federal government.The predominantly red label — which includes an image of the Anheuser-Busch eagle, the A-B compass and hops – bears this legend: “Budweiser American Ale defines a new style of ale –

The American Ale – created by Anheuser-Busch brewmasters to deliver robust ale taste that’s full-bodied, but not too heavy nor too bitter.”The neck ringer further plays up the “American” angle: “Budweiser American Ale. An ale that’s distinctly American in character. Savor the difference.”

From BrewBlog.com:

New Budweiser Line Extension on Tap? Receives label approval for Budweiser American Ale. Anheuser-Busch appears poised to roll out a craft-style line extension of its Budweiser brand. The brewer has received label approval from the Treasury Department’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau for Budweiser American Ale.

Bud American Ale has 5.1 percent alcohol by volume, according to label filings. A-B received approvals for 12-ounce bottles and three sizes of barrels (half, quarter and 1/6). It’s worth noting that A-B appears ready to extend the Bud brand into the craft space on the heels of Miller Brewing Company introducing the Miller Lite Brewers Collection, a trio of craft-style light beers.

If Bud American Ale sounds familiar, it’s because A-B flirted with rolling it out back in 1997 to take on the nascent Sam Adams Boston Lager. But A-B didn’t pull the trigger then. Now that crafts are once again hot – and as Bud continues to decline – A-B appears to be reconsidering.

Rolling out an “American Ale” would seem to fit in with A-B’s efforts to leverage the craftsmanship and heritage of the Bud label. That said, it’s somewhat ironic A-B would roll out a Bud ale given “Great American Lager” ads for Bud take shots at “heavy” and “cloudy” beers.

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